Garden Gardening June Melbourne Victoria Australia Winter Garden

June in the Garden!

Winter isn’t coming, it’s here! June marks the beginning of winter. The stark trees, bitterly cold nights and cloudy days have done a pretty good job at reminding us all of that. But the best way to stay warm this winter is to stay active and get some gardening done!

Many may not realise that winter is the time avid gardeners do a lot of their preparation and planning. The garden reveals everything in winter. The deciduous trees and shrubs are now bare giving more space and light to areas that haven’t seen any since last year. The need for pruning becomes apparent and the bare skeleton of the plant makes it a lot easier to assess what needs to be done.

During winter we also clean up. We turn in the last of the autumn leaves into the compost heap and prepare our garden beds with compost, manure and mulch. Weeding, clearing decks and pavers are also best done now and then, after all that, there are even some things to plant!

Currently, Lavenders, Camellias, Daisies, Pansys and Violas are blooming beautifully and so are some natives such as Grevilleas, Banksias, Hakeas, Proteas and Kangaroo Paws. Bulbs are sprouting, getting ready for a spring display, and in the Veggie patch, there is a lot happening.

June Garden Gardening Melbourne Australia Victoria

With our list of things to do, winter will fly by and you’ll be ready to hop into spring!

 

Bare Rooted Plants! 

A Farmer with Bare Root Fruit Trees

It’s that time of year again! Bare-root is BACK and we have loads of Bare Rooted Roses ready to go in-store. In winter, plants go dormant and dormant plants transplant much easier and stress-free than when they’re in leaf. This includes your roses, fruit trees and deciduous ornamentals such as Poplars, Elms, Ash’s and Oaks, just to name a few. Every year, nurseries supply vast amounts of bare-rooted plants at much cheaper prices than if they were in their pots. This is because they are easier to store and transport, thus keeping costs low.

Choose trees with a good structure or framework. Check for any splits. And remember to prune your fruit and ornamental trees back before planting. This pruning is to remove any damaged branches and roots as well as prepare the overall shape for the spring.

We have a big range of bare-rooted fruit trees and ornamental trees already in-store and more coming in pretty soon, so keep an eye out for those on our website. Here are some that we have already received:

Plant Roses –  Bare Root Roses!

Now is the best time of the year to purchase your standard roses as we have hundreds of beautiful quality roses in stock. Whether you want 20 of the same colour or perhaps a fantastic mix of different colour roses depending on the garden colour scheme of your choice, you can get all of them in-store here in Campbellfield!

We have the classic iceberg varieties in 3ft and many colour varieties in 3ft and 4ft standards.

For more on how to plant your Bare Root Roses, Click here!

To check out our full range of Bare Rooted Roses, Click here!

 

Get a FREE GARDEN DESIGN!!


If you’re starting a new garden bed you a whole new garden, winter can be a great time to start planning it. Once you’ve completed some of the steps below you can start to plan out where you will want to plant that new hedge or vegetable patch, build up an entirely new garden bed or landscape the whole backyard! We understand that this can sometimes be a little daunting so if you’re unsure, speak to one of our sales staff about our Free Garden Design service with Chris. He will be able to assist you with all your future garden plans!

Garden Stimulus Package!!

Make the most out of our Garden Stimulus Deals! We have heavily discounted over 70 of our top selling products to make gardening affordable even with a small budget!
Click here to see all our Garden Stimulus Deals!

Garden Colour

Very often we tend to think of winter as being a very dull time of the year for the garden. We have put together a little selection of plants that will flower in winter or just add a splash of colour thanks to their vibrant foliage!

Winter Flowers

Indoor Plants

Some days it is just too cold to be outdoors gardening, and also, not everyone has the luxury of outdoor space for plants. If that is the case for you, you can always get some indoor plants to brighten up your living spaces.

Here are some important tips for indoor plants during winter:

  • Indoor plants grow very slowly during winter, so no need to fertilise.
  • Prune and remove dead branches to tidy up the plant.
  • Keep your plants away from heaters and vents as these cause the plant to dry up and wilt pretty fast. So water your plants sufficiently.
  • Keep an eye on the soil moisture level of the soil to avoid over-watering.
  • As the trajectory of the sun has changed in the sky, you might need to move the plants to a sunnier/brighter spot.
  • Clean the windows for maximum sunlight and also the leaves of your plants of dust, to allow them to photosynthesise efficiently.

The Vegetable Garden

Planting Veggies in Melbourne’s Winter is very rewarding!

It’s truly cold now, but it is just what some veggies love! Many people are concerned that nothing will survive in the cold weather, but that is just wrong because many winter veggies thrive and grow so well in the cold weather! It is even easier as you will rarely need to water the garden!

You can plant the whole range of brassicas such as cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts.
Leafy greens such as Asian greens like mizuna, tatsoi, pak choi, lettuce, rocket, spinach, mustards, spring onions, leek, kale and swiss chard.
Legumes such as Snow Peas and Sugar snap peas are very easy plants to grow right now, just make sure to provide some trellis for them.
Root crops such as radish, beetroot, turnips, swedes, parsnips, carrots, onions, potatoes and garlic. All of those would take 2-3 months before harvest, except for radish which is ready in just 30 days, while potatoes take between 90 and 170 days and garlic that takes about seven to eight months!

You can now remove any protective netting that I was using to safeguard the brassica and Asian green plants from the Cabbage White Moth and its hungry progeny, the caterpillars. As the weather has cooled enough, the moths or butterflies no longer pose a problem.

Asparagus Time to cut back the asparagus fern to the ground, which has yellowed as expected and then top-dress the plants with a combination of compost, aged cow manure and some slow-release fertiliser pellets.

Check out our available range of fruits, vegetables and herbs.

Some great companion plants for all these are herbs such as sage, winter thyme, parsley, mint, chives, coriander, dill, oregano, marjoram, etc that deter pests such as caterpillars. Basil does not tolerate the cold and should be grown in warmer months.

Edible Flowers

Flowers such as Pansies, Violas, Nasturtiums, Calendula and Borage are great for the winter patch! They add colour, diversity, repel pests and most importantly are tasty and pretty additions to salads!


To see our full selection of Fruits, veggies and herbs in store. Click Here!

Native Plants

Native plants are beautiful! They provide shelter and food for wildlife and promote biodiversity and stewardship of our natural heritage. They are unique because they are perfectly suited to the environment that they belong to. This means that they should survive on local rainfall patterns and in the local soil! Here is a selection of the most popular varieties we have in store right now!


Click here to see all of our Natives!

Garden Tasks!

Frost! Winter is here!

Frost on leaves

Frost forms from water vapour in the air, coming in contact with an object that is below freezing temperature. So basically, when the moisture in the air touches a freezing cold windscreen, the moisture sticks to the windscreen and turns to ice!

When it comes to our plants, they expel energy continuously through the day and the night. Energy is warmth! During the day, their expelled energy is replaced by radiant heat from the sun, but at night time they become cooler as their warmth is not continually replaced. When the plant cools enough to get to freezing temperatures, frost can then form on its leaves.

You may notice under large trees there is little to no frost. Large trees shelter the plants and grass underneath. Their canopy radiates energy downward from the underside of their leaves, as these “breathe out”. This expulsion of energy keeps the area under the tree warmer for longer during the night. This is why planting your more frost-sensitive plants under trees and shelter can help protect them from frost.

Hello Hello Plants Melbourne Victoria Australia Frost on grass in the shade, the sun melting the other side by #arteliz

Sun melting the frost, and the shade sheltering it

Some plants can handle frost better than others. The moisture inside of the plant’s cells freeze and, like all frozen water, it expands, which can cause stress on the cells and therefore damage to the plant. When the ice is quickly thawed by the morning sun, it causes the most damage to the plant.

If your plants have been damaged by frost, don’t cut off the damaged foliage until the frosts have finished as this dead foliage will actually act as protection for future frosts.

How to tackle frost

  • Cover your frost-sensitive plants with sheets, newspaper or straw, making sure to remove them the following day.
  • Lightly water your plants before sunrise by a sprinkler system (or by hand if you’re really keen!) This can prevent frost from forming. You can lightly water frost affected plants, which gently thaws the ice, reducing the damage from the frost.
  • Use plastic sleeves and stakes to protect plants in open areas

 

Preparing the garden. Everything is bare so time to prepare!

Weed Control

Arctotheca calendula Capeweed in flower

Arctotheca calendula Capeweed in flower

Weeds don’t have a seasonal preference, they’ll turn up any ole time! But our one saving grace is they turn up less often in winter and the established ones that need to come out are easier to see. The soil is moist, which makes it easier to pull out these little suckers.

For the tougher weeds like clumps of Crowsfoot and Crabgrass, Dandelions or Oxalis you made need a tool to get the whole root out. The importance of getting the whole root out is so it doesn’t re-sprout. We don’t want to have to weed again! You can use a hoe or even a butter knife.

Compost

You don’t have to throw those weeds into the green bin. Chuck them straight into your compost. You will want to start building up your compost, if you haven’t already, with all your garden scraps from your winter cleaning. This will all break down over winter and be ready to put into the garden in spring.

Clearing and cleaning

The leaves that have fallen can all be turned into empty or new garden beds. By doing this you will also aerate the soil, which not only allows more oxygen flow but more water and nutrients to work through. Any mulch leftover can either be scraped back and put in the compost or, if there’s not too much, turn it into the soil along with the leaves to break down.

Existing plants and garden beds

For your existing plants, you will want to reapply mulch to keep the soil warm and retain moisture in the soil around the roots.
You may notice some of your hedging plants are turning a little yellow. This is often caused by a nutrient deficiency that occurs during the winter months. It’s nothing to be worried about as it can be easily fixed by applying Dolomite lime to the soil. It takes a few months to take effect so be patient!

Transplanting and moving

With the nice cool weather, it is an ideal time to move or transplant plants as the plants have time over winter to grow new roots and be ready for spring. You can repot plants that have outgrown their pots and are getting root-bound. Remove the plant and trim some of the roots at the bottom, shake off some old soil and add some fresh ones at the bottom of the pot to give your plant a fresh start. They will love it!

Pruning

This is a big one! Winter is when all major pruning is done because you are able to see the full structure of the plant and remove any problem branches. Fruit trees and roses in particular benefit from a good prune. Fruit trees fruit more prolifically and healthily after a good prune. Roses, too, flower better and look much more beautiful.

For more information on pruning, Click here!

That is all for this June in the Garden tips and tricks article, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Wishing you all the best, keep yourself warm and safe this winter!

Hello Hello Plants.

Hello hello Plants Garden Stimulus

Garden Stimulus Package! Get Stimulated in the Garden!!

Aussies have been hit hard by the government’s current job seeker package ending, and the dream of getting the garden finished before the house goes on sale becomes less of a reality.

But we hear you!!

We have released our own stimulus package for growers and gardeners alike! Growers need to move their stock and gardeners need a break from the never-ending costs of their garden.

We have loads of new specials from in-store and growers across Melbourne and we’ve kept prices real loooow so you can still stay within your now tighter budget.

And to stimulate your garden success even more we’re still doing our FREE Garden Designs (book in via our website!), FREE Metro Melbourne Delivery for orders over $300.

If that doesn’t stimulate your gardening, I don’t know what can!

Our top Garden Stimulus offers!

$4.99 or less DEALS!

More Specials!

Big Plants Super Specials!

Bare Root Rosese blog banner 2

Bare Root Standard Roses 2021!

Bare Rooted Standard roses are NOW IN-STORE!

We have our first shipment of bare-rooted roses for this season.

Now is the best time of the year to purchase your standard roses as we have hundreds of beautiful quality roses in stock. Whether you want 20 of the same colour or perhaps a fantastic mix of different colour roses depending on the garden colour scheme of your choice, you can get all of them in-store here in Campbellfield!

We have the classic iceberg varieties in 3ft and many colour varieties in 3ft and 4ft standards.

What are bare rooted plants and how to plant them?

Bare root means a plant is supplied without soil around the roots. In winter, roses usually stop growing and become dormant. They are dug from the ground, are pruned and the roots are washed free of soil prior to packing and transport. They come to you without foliage or flowers. Read more about this technique and how to properly plant them by clicking here.

Advantages of bare root roses:

☆ They are easy to transport
☆ Many Varieties – Sizes and Colours to choose from!
☆ You can get as many as you want for long rows!
☆ Healthy and Strong plants!
☆ Cheaper than Spring/Summer roses!
☆ Available in-store now!
☆ Plant in winter and get flowers in spring!

Advantages of standard roses:

☆ Create a 2 -story layered garden effect with your roses at the top and other plants at the bottom.
☆ Easy to weed at the bottom of the standard roses, without getting pricked by thorns.
☆ Very appealing effect by planting long rows of the same variety.
☆ Available in 2ft, 3ft and 4ft heights depending on your requirements.
☆ Easy to trim and maintain due to their height.
☆ Very hardy and easy to grow
☆ Some delightfully fragrant varieties are available.

Standard Roses Garden

Call  PH: (03) 9359 3331 or email sales@hellohelloplants.com.au

3ft Iceberg Roses

3ft Colour Roses

4ft Colour Roses

Shipping and Delivery

We cannot post 3ft and 4ft roses, however, we do deliver Victoria wide and we can also send them by Freight. Unfortunately, we cannot send them to Tasmania. Click here to read about our delivery service and click here to read about our FREE delivery offer!
Call  PH: (03) 9359 3331 or email sales@hellohelloplants.com.au for more information.

Hello Hello Plants Mothers day 2021

Mother’s Day Specials 2021!

We all know how much mum loves her plants (I mean who doesn’t!), so getting her a little plant baby to show her how much you appreciate her is a sure-fire way to make mum happy. 

Mother’s Day!

With Mother’s Day right around the corner, come to the nursery and get some lovely plants to treat your mum and grandmother. We have a big range of indoor plants to brighten up the kitchen or living room, some fragrant flowers, flowering trees and so much more at very low prices! Or you can also get a gift voucher, which might be more convenient. These can be mailed by post or emailed and can be redeemed in-store or even online.

Top Outdoor plants for mum!

Forget the boring common bunches of flowers that everybody buys, and get something that will undoubtedly make mum happy for years to come! Here is a selection of the best fragrant, beautiful flowering plants that keep on giving!

 

Top Indoor plants for mum!

Living room, kitchen counter, bathroom or even bedroom! So much room that can fit so many plants! Here are some fantastic choices:

 

Cottage Flowers!

Mum loves her cottage garden, full of flowers! Get some popping colour that attracts and feeds the pollinators.

 

This is for anyone under 12 years of age. $2 Deals!

To help out all our budding Horticulturalists and gardeners get mum this perfect gift, we’ve created a little leafy combination that will be created by them, just for mum!

Come in store and for just $2 you can get any of the following plants for mum!

  • Native Violet 3” Pot 
  • Blue Chalk Stick 3” Pot
  • Jade Succulent 3” Pot (Broadleaf)
  • Agave 3” Pot
  • Seaside Daisy 3” Pot
  • Corsican Mint 3” Pot
  • Snow in Summer 3” Pot
  • Begonia ‘Bronze Leaf’ 4” Pot
  • Coleus 3” Pot
  • White Creeping Thyme 3” Pot
Hello Hello plants May gardening melbourne Victoria Australia

May in the Garden!

Let the cold weather begin! May brings the first frosts, cold nights and a blaze of Autumn colour and leaf fall from our deciduous trees and shrubs. There are lots of trees still bearing beautiful autumn foliage such as the Crimson Sentry Maples, London Plane trees and Golden Elms but by the end of the month, most deciduous trees will be completely bare and in their stark, sculptural winter form.

However, it’s not all grim for May as there are some beautiful flowers blooming and a lot of delicious fruit to harvest. Get some gardening gloves ready, as there are quite a lot of things to get done during this time, in preparation for the months to come.

Hello Hello Plants Melbourne Victoria AustraliaFallen leaves around Ballarat Lake edge by #arteliz

Fallen autumn leaves around Ballarat Lake edge

Mother’s Day!

With Mother’s Day right around the corner, come to the nursery and get some lovely plants to treat your mum and grandmother. We have a big range of indoor plants to brighten up the kitchen or living room, some fragrant flowers, flowering trees and so much more at very low prices! Or you can also get a gift voucher, which might be more convenient. These can be mailed by post or emailed and can be redeemed in-store or even online.

Top picks for mum!

Forget the boring common bunches of flowers that everybody buys, and get something that will undoubtedly make mum happy for years to come! Here is a selection of the best fragrant and beautiful flowering plants that keep on giving!

What is flowering right now?

There are some beauties just about to flower, such as camellias, begonias, salvias, Dianthus and some delightfully scented daphnes.

Cottage Flowers. Add some popping colour to your garden and attract and feed the pollinators.

Camellias. Queens of the winter flowers, Camellias are attractive evergreen shrubs that are highly prized for the beauty of their exquisite blooms, their splendid evergreen foliage and their compact shapely habit.

 

May in the Garden

Frosts & Frost Coverings

Hello Hello Plants Melbourne Victoria Australia frost on strawberry leaves close up by #arteliz

Frost on Strawberry Leaves

On still, cold nights, frost forms on our lawns, windscreens and makes our early morning starts even more difficult, particularly getting out of bed!

In May, frost really only forms in regional areas and the very outer suburbs of Melbourne, where it gets cold enough to form ice. Conditions have to be still with no cloud, and temperatures that drop below freezing.

Cold air is heavier than warm, so frost stays low to the ground and often rolls downhill, pooling in low points or gullies. Hedges and fences can catch rolling frost down a slope, which can cause a rather frosty spot.

How does frost form?

Frost forms from water vapour in the air, coming in contact with an object that is below freezing temperature.

Hello Hello Plants Melbourne Victoria Australia Close up of Frost forming on a fence in Trentham by #arteliz

Frost on a fence in Trentham

So basically, when the moisture in the air touches a freezing cold windscreen, the moisture sticks to the windscreen and turns to ice!

When it comes to our plants, they expel energy continuously through the day and the night. Energy is warmth! During the day, their expelled energy is replaced by radiant heat from the sun, but at night time they become cooler as their warmth is not continually replaced. When the plant cools enough to get to freezing temperatures, frost can then form on its leaves.

Hello Hello Plants Melbourne Victoria Australia Frosty autumn leaves in Trentham close up by #arteliz

Frosty autumn leaves in Trentham

You may notice under large trees there is little to no frost. Large trees shelter the plants and grass underneath. Their canopy radiates energy downward from the underside of their leaves, as these “breathe out”. This expulsion of energy keeps the area under the tree warmer for longer during the night. This is why planting your more frost-sensitive plants under trees and shelter can help protect them from frost.

Hello Hello Plants Melbourne Victoria Australia Frost on grass in the shade, the sun melting the other side by #arteliz

Sun melting the frost, and the shade sheltering it

Some plants can handle frost better than others. The moisture inside of the plant’s cells freeze and, like all frozen water, it expands, which can cause stress on the cells and therefore damage to the plant. When the ice is quickly thawed by the morning sun, it causes the most damage to the plant.

If your plants have been damaged by frost, don’t cut off the damaged foliage until the frosts have finished as this dead foliage will actually act as protection for the future frosts.

How to tackle frost

  • Cover your frost-sensitive plants with sheets, newspaper or straw, making sure to remove it the following day.
  • Lightly water your plants before sunrise by a sprinkler system (or by hand if you’re really keen!) This can prevent frost from forming. You can lightly water frost affected plants, which gently thaws the ice, reducing the damage from the frost.
  • Use plastic sleeves and stakes to protect plants in open areas

Weeding

Arctotheca calendula Capeweed in flower

Arctotheca calendula Capeweed in flower

Weeds run rampant this time of year. You may have seen more and more popping up in the garden such as Bindii, Capeweed and the culinary Mustard weed.

Due to the increase in moisture from the autumn rains, the soil is loose, making weeds easier to pull out. As some of these weeds are just starting to appear it is always good to get them out while they’re young and their roots haven’t taken hold. If your weeds don’t have seeds on them, chuck them into your compost for added nitrogen!

Free plant nutrition in your autumn leaves! 

Most of the leaves have fallen off the trees so we now have an abundance of free plant food!

Every year, hundreds of Victorians begrudgingly get out their rakes and green bins and begin to rake up those fallen leaves to toss out. But little do they know they are throwing away valuable material. Almost everything in the garden is recyclable and leaves are certainly no exception.

Hello Hello Plants Melbourne Victoria Australia Wet autumn leaves in the Dandenong Ranges close up by #arteliz

Wet autumn leaves in the Dandenong Ranges

Leaves naturally fall around trees, creating a soft, decomposing bed around the base of the tree, keeping the soil protected and warm as well as eventually breaking down and improving the soil. Trees are very clever and prepare their own soil!

In smaller gardens, fallen leaves should be removed to allow the lawn to grow (as leaf littered lawns will die in patches) and prevent them from harbouring snails and slugs, as they love living in this moist environment.

Collect and store your autumn leaves for use throughout the year. It is best to try and compost or decompose your leaves from the beginning as dried leaves are a hot spot for earwigs to nest. These little pests usually help the decomposition process but they can also cause a lot of damage to your lush plants, much like snails and slugs! If you want to store them dry, store them in a sealed container so these pests can’t get in.

You can store your precious collected leaves in a large barrel, garden bin or even a garbage bag. Water them down to keep them moist and promote fungal growth, furthering the decomposition. If they’re stored in a large bin, layer them like you would your compost bin, with high nitrogen plants to replace the nitrogen the leaves have lost. (This would be a great use for all your pulled out weeds!)

Leaves can also be added to your compost if it is smelling bad from too much vegetable matter and this adds phosphate, potassium and other essential elements.

Leaves take 6-12 months to break down and become a beautiful mould.

Bare Root is coming…

It’s almost time for BARE ROOTED FRUIT TREES and other wonderfully cheap deciduous trees! Winter marks the time for bare root so it’s best to get your garden beds prepared.

Till your soil, creating a loose, well-draining medium and make sure it is free from pests and diseases. Turn in any fallen autumn leaves and ready compost you may have so it can rest for the month before planting. Give the bed a good watering to keep all your microorganisms happy and healthy!

More information about Bare Rooted plants & why we love them here.

Evergreen Fruits

Citrus Limon "Dwarf Lemonade" @ Hello Hello PlantsIf you haven’t done so already, get your citrus and evergreen fruit trees in the ground now. That’s all your lemons, limes and oranges as well as guavas like Feijoa, Chilean and Strawberry guava. Dig a hole twice the size of the pot and water the hole. Partly fill your new hole so that you can place the plant’s root ball into it so the top of the root ball is level with the top of the soil. Back-fill with a light, fluffy soil or well-composted soil, nothing too rich. Keep weeds and lawn away from the base of the tree as these plants have shallow roots and don’t want to compete for water and nutrients. Mulch around the base, keeping the mulch away from the trunk. This will keep the weeds away, and the soil warm and moist until the spring. Water once per week or as needed as even winter can be dry! Some fruits that you can harvest right now are persimmons, various citrus fruit, feijoas, raspberries and strawberries.

Berries. Put in some delicious berries for that home grown home grown freshness.

Citrus plants. We have a great variety in 4L pots that are on sale right now! These are fantastic varieties that were originally destined for Victorian fruit farms, so you know they were born to produce fruit, plus they are very affordable.

Various fruit. Here is a great selection of the most popular and rare dwarf varieties, ideal for small spaces. Some are in limited quantities, so better hurry up.

The Vegetable Patch

Green Manure Crops

Late autumn-winter is bean and pea planting season. These wonderful, plentiful veggies are best planted now. They add nitrogen into an otherwise depleted veggie bed and provide an abundance of peas and beans at the same time! Two for one! At the end of the season, your veggie bed will be ready for your spring crop.

For a good green manure crop plant beans such as broad or fava, peas and oats.

Other things to note…

  • Before planting Autumn and Winter veg, enrich your soil by top dressing with some compost and manure and let it settle for a week. If the soil is too hard from being baked by the summer heat, you can gently turn it over to incorporate some organic matter into it, which will make new crops grow better. If you have hard or clay soil you can also add some soil wetter to make water penetrate more easily and retain moisture.
  • Give new seedlings a good boost with an application of liquid fertiliser after a week and they will reward you later on.
  • Autumn and winter veggies that should either already be in the ground or need to be planted now are as follows:
    -Greens such as silverbeet, leeks, celery, watercress, lettuce, rocket, spring onion.
    -Herbs such as  parsley, thyme, oregano, coriander etc
    -Asian greens such as Pak Choi, Kailan, Choi Sum
    -Brassicas such as broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussel sprouts.
    -Root veggies such as beetroot, turnip, radish, parsnip, onions, carrots and garlic.
    -Legumes such as sugar snap/Snow peas and broad beans.

Check out our available range of vegetables and herbs.

Fertilizing

Due to the frequent rain in Autumn, nutrients leach away from the soil. Nitrogen or Nitrates are the most common essential nutrients that leach away, along with other highly soluble minerals such as calcium. You may tend to notice discolouration or yellowing leaves on your plants.

Use slow-release fertilizers or seaweed solutions instead of traditional instant “NPK” ones. These take time to break down and give a steady supply of nutrients for a few months. Choosing the right fertilizer for the right plant is important as these contain trace elements that the specific plants require which are often scarce in normal soil.

Click here for a full list of fertilizers.

Click here to view a chart of various possible deficiencies in plants. 

FREE Garden Design and FREE Weeping Cherry Tree!

For the month of May, we have an exclusive offer you will not want to miss! Following your FREE Garden Design with Chris, if you pay for your plants selected during your design meeting on the same day and spend over $1000, we will give you a FREE Advanced Weeping Cherry 20″ Pot worth $300!!

There are 4 varieties to choose from:
Cheals
Rosea
Falling Snow
Subhirtella Alba

Weeping Cherries are the perfect small feature tree for the suburban garden and can even be planted in large pots or half wine barrels on the back patio!

Get in whilst stocks last. Limit 1 per customer, per Garden Design!

Click here to read more about this exclusive offer!

Hello Hello Plants Facebook Review Positve Review Highly Recommended

Garden Stimulus! Best plant deals in Victoria!

Aussies have been hit hard by the government’s current job seeker package ending, and the dream of getting the garden finished before the house goes on sale becomes less of a reality. But we hear you!!

We have released our own stimulus package for growers and gardeners alike! Growers need to move their stock and gardeners need a break from the never-ending costs of their garden.

We have loads of new specials from in-store and growers across Melbourne and we’ve kept prices real loooow so you can still stay within your now tighter budget.

If that doesn’t stimulate your gardening, I don’t know what can!

Our top Garden Stimulus offers!

Hello hello Plants Garden Stimulus

Garden Stimulus!

Aussies have been hit hard by the government’s current job seeker package ending, and the dream of getting the garden finished before the house goes on sale becomes less of a reality.

But we hear you!!

We have released our own stimulus package for growers and gardeners alike! Growers need to move their stock and gardeners need a break from the never-ending costs of their garden.

We have loads of new specials from in-store and growers across Melbourne and we’ve kept prices real loooow so you can still stay within your now tighter budget.

And to stimulate your garden success even more we’re still doing our FREE Garden Designs (book in via our website!), FREE Metro Melbourne Delivery for orders over $300. Following your FREE Garden Design with Chris, if you pay for your plants selected during your design meeting on the same day and spend over $1000, we will give you a FREE Advanced Weeping Cherry 20″ Pot worth $300!!

If that doesn’t stimulate your gardening, I don’t know what can!

Our top Garden Stimulus offers!

In the Veggie patch!

Right now is the perfect time to get your winter veggie patch going! We have lots of great varieties that such as purple and yellow cauliflower!!

Check out our available range of vegetables and herbs.

April in the Garden! Happy Easter 2021!

Hello Hello, dear gardening friends!

April usually marks the unofficial beginning of Autumn and the beginning of the longest season of the Kulin nation; ‘Waring’ or Wombat season! Unlike autumn, which lasts from March-May, Waring lasts from April to July. It marks the beginning of misty mornings, low temperatures and higher rainfall. Days begin to get shorter and brilliant fungi start to appear. And how can we forget the stunning change of foliage colour amongst Melbourne’s gorgeous deciduous plants!

All over the city, our giant trees are putting on a display of reds, oranges and yellows, their spent leaves colouring the footpaths and streets. Golden Elms and Ash are shining gold beacons, Scarlet Oaks and Maples produce vibrant lipstick reds and Japanese Maples start to really shine with varying colours, all on a single tree. This time of year is not only about colourful foliage. Camellia’s are beginning to flower, Native Violets are covered with upright purple flowers that the bees adore, Salvia’s and Gazania are continuing their summer flower display along with newly budding flowers of Pimeleas, Daisies and Alyssum.  

Free Weeping Cherry offer with Garden Designs!

Make sure to check out our Free Advanced Weeping cherry offer that comes with our Free Garden Design service by Chris! Click here to read more!

Preparing the Garden

Autumn is a very busy time of the year for gardeners. Soils still retain their summer warmth and become moist with more rainfall, making it a great time to plant and prepare garden beds. Free mulch literally falls from the sky with autumn leaves, which can be turned into the soil or compost, making your soil fluffy and rich, ready for planting. It is also a good time to turn in any aged compost and mulch, and remove spent summer vegetables, ready for your next crop. You may have already begun this process following our ‘March in the Garden’ article, but if you haven’t, you definitely need to get onto it now! It may not seem like it but this can take some time to do, but boy is it worth it.

What to Plant

Your garden is now becoming prepped for new planting. Deciduous trees, are best planted in autumn. The soil needs to be soft, well-draining and have minimal nutrients in it. Make sure you haven’t added any extra fertilisers into the soil before you plant a deciduous tree or shrub as this can give it a rude awakening. Deciduous plants are going into dormancy for winter and won’t require any fertiliser until late winter-early spring. Birches, Elms and Ashes make for great planting now. Weeping Cherries and Japanese Maples are ideal feature trees for a small suburban garden and are beginning to put on quite a show!

For the non-deciduous plants that are ready for autumn and Winter flowering, they will require some food to produce their beautiful blooms. Beautiful autumn and winter bloomers such as Camellia’s and Azalea’s will need a fertiliser such as Osmocote Controlled Release Fertiliser: Roses, Gardenia’s, Azalea’s and Camellia’s. The right balance of nutrients and minerals coupled with the correct soil pH produce the perfect blooms. If your flowers aren’t forming correctly or the colours aren’t right, it could be a pH or fertiliser problem so this is something to keep in mind when they first start to form.

It is not commonly known but autumn marks the start of the best planting time for natives. It is ideal to plants natives from autumn through to spring when the temperatures aren’t so harsh. And there are some absolutely iridescent natives that put on a spectacular show during this time of the year. Victoria’s floral emblem, Epacris impressa or Common Heath is currently putting on quite a show throughout the Wombat State and other forests. Though usually flowering in late autumn, it has decided to start early this year. Other stunning flowering natives include Banksia’s, which are much loved by cockatoos, Crowea and Correa. Click here to see all our Native plants!

Get your spring-flowering bulbs in the ground by the end of April. Refrigeration or cooling of bulbs in the soil during winter help produce taller flowers with better blooms in the spring. Some of the best producing bulbs are Daffodils, Tulips and Iris.

Fungi and Mushrooms

As the days get cooler and the nights longer, autumn provides a fantastic opportunity to throw on some warm clothes, get outside into the fresh air, and go mushroom foraging.

Mushrooms are rich in B vitamins: riboflavin, niacin, and pantothenic acid. The combination helps protect heart health. Riboflavin is good for red blood cells. Niacin is good for the digestive system and for maintaining healthy skin.

The mushroom season in Victoria depends on many factors, however, as from April to June are fairly ideal for foraging, with many tours operating during these months.

Important note about wild mushroom safety: While Victoria has a good variety of edible, wild mushrooms, the region is also home to a number of mushroom species that can cause illness and/or death. These include the yellow stainer (Agaricus xanthodermus) and death cap (Amanita phalloides). The Victorian Government’s Better Health website has further information on the risks of consuming wild mushrooms in Victoria.

You can also visit Facebook groups such as Australia & New Zealand Fungus Identification But always be cautious with online advice.

Mushroom foraging guided tours

Instead, look into mushroom tours offer a great chance to learn how to correctly identify edible mushrooms (and avoid the poisonous ones). Here are some tours that you could join:

-Mushroom Foraging & Lunch at lil’ acres,Woodend, Vic 3442.
-Maxs May Mushroom Meander- Red Hill, Victoria.
-Mushroomtours, Moorooduc.

Growing your own mushrooms!

There are several great workshop and mushroom growing suppliers in Melbourne that can assist you in this fun adventure.
-Milkwood (Online)
-The Mushroomery (In Person)

What to do if mushrooms pop up in the garden or pots?

Mushrooms growing in your garden beds or pots are an indication of healthy soil. The mycorrhizal/fungal network connect individual plants together and transfer water, carbon, nitrogen, and other nutrients and minerals. The actual mushroom is only the fruiting body of that network and is responsible for spreading spores to colonise new places. They also assist to decompose organic matter and make it available to other plants. So if you see mushrooms or fungus growing in your patch or pots, you can safely leave them there. Inform your children that these are poisonous and not to eat them. Pets usually are not interested in mushrooms, but if you have a curious pet, it would be better to pull them out. 

Mulch

Mulch that was laid down in spring or summer last year should still be thick enough to protect your plants this Autumn, so you do not need to top it up. As a matter of fact, if your mulch has not broken down much and is still quite thick, i.e over 4 inches, you might want to remove some of it to keep about 1-2 inches tops. A thick mulch layer will retain too much humidity over in the cool and wet Autumn weather and create the perfect environment for a host of diseases, especially fungal ones, that will spread to and affect your plants. Excess mulch can be saved for later or be added to the compost heap.

The Vegetable Patch

Most summer crops that have provided a bounty of fresh veggies are now looking a bit scraggly, reaching the end of the lifecycle. They can be pulled out, chopped up and composted as long as they are disease-free. Some chillies, capsicum and eggplant can be left a little longer in the ground until they are done fruiting. You can try to keep your chillies and capsicum going over winter by having them in a pot, protected from the cold and frost over the coming months.

  • Harvest most of your summer crops because the cool weather prevents them from growing any more or ripening. There are many great ways to preserve excess produce such as Fermenting, Canning, Snap Freezing, Pickling, and Drying. You can also donate the excess to charity associations such as Foodbank<