Top 10 Indoor air purifying toxin removing plants

Top 10 Indoor Air Purifying Plants!

Indoor Plants: Air Purifying Edition

Are you looking to purify the air in your home? Reduce toxins? Then check out this list of Air Purifying Indoor Plants that made the list on NASA’s Clean Air Study. Keep in mind that you need to have one plant for every 10 square metres to achieve this! Sounds like a good excuse to expand your indoor plant collection (shhh, we won’t tell anyone!)

 

Golden Cane Palm 

Dypsis lutescens ‘Golden Cane Palm’

The Golden Cane Palm grows up to 2 meters indoors and will provide lush green foliage and gorgeous gold-coloured bamboo stems! They like good drainage and nice bright light. Due to being a palm and more on the tropical side, they will do better in moody Victoria when indoors as they need warmer temperature and humidity, all of which Melbourne fails to provide most of the time.

Toxins removed: benzene, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, xylene.


Peace Lily

Looking for a painless, straightforward and sometimes theatrical indoor plant that will give you lush green foliage with unique white flowers? Look no further! The Peace Lily is the one for you. They can handle low to brightly lit areas and are simply happy with weekly watering. They’ll tell you when they need it, they can be quite the drama queen. They are one of the most efficient air cleaners and, even better, they are super pretty and undemanding!

Toxins removed: benzene, carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, xylene

 

Devil’s Ivy Pothos

This toxin remover is an easy to grow indoor plant that can be trained up a pole or hanging down in a vine-like habit. The Devil’s Ivy or Pothos like protection from the sun. So that’s good news for those of you in a house that’s never heard or seen bright light! 

Pothos only need watering when the soil feels dry but they can also benefit from the occasional misting or humidifier. A real good beginner’s indoor plant we say!

Toxins removed: xylene, benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene.

 

Lady Palm

Finally! An indoor plant that can handle the cold and dramatic ups and downs of Melbourne’s weather (unfortunately some of us are not so lucky). The Rhapis Lady Palm is a great way to bring the thick, green foliage inside while purifying your air! They are quite slow-growing, so they can stay in the same pot for long periods of time. Perfect for the lazy plant parent!

Toxins removed: ammonia, formaldehyde and xylene

 

Bamboo Palm

Let’s take a step back in time and look at the Bamboo Palm, which was a favourite in Victorian-era houses. Imagine if a palm and bamboo had a love child – this is what you’d get, which we love! It prefers to be in an indoor position with bright, warm, indirect sunlight and can grow to a whopping 3 meters tall! It likes moist, well draining soil.

Toxins removed: benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene

 

English Ivy

Ladies and Gents, we have a winner! The Hedra English Ivy was voted one of the best air purifier indoor houseplants by NASA. Commonly seen growing outdoors, English Ivy also looks great indoors in hanging baskets or small pots, looking elegant whilst purifying your air at the same time! We love a multi-tasker. They’re super easy to propagate too!

Toxins removed: benzene, formaldehyde, xylene and toluene.

 

Spider PlantChlorophytum Comosum Vittatum 'Spider Plant'

If you have some questionable plant care history that you would prefer to not discuss when it comes to indoor plants and needs something easy to start new (it’s okay, we won’t judge) – then the Spider Plant is a perfect choice for plant newbies or the recently reformed! They thrive in indirect light and can handle lots of conditions. Its leaves hang gracefully down, producing little white clusters of flowers on long stems. Watch these little fellows as they eventually turn into little baby spider plants!

Toxins removed: formaldehyde and xylene.

 

Boston Fern

Nephrolepis Boston Fern

Boston Ferns! Easy to grow, beautiful fronds and did you know they’re also a toxin remover too! These bad boys can get up to 1m in height and width when they are doing their best – crazy right?! To achieve this, keep them away from direct sunlight and keep the soil moist. To keep them even happier, they love a good misting to create some humidity.

Toxins removed: Mainly formaldehyde but also filters out toxins like ammonia, benzene and xylene

 

Dracaena

Dracaena marginata

The Dracaena looks like a mini tree or palm and works beautifully as a tall feature plant! Bring the outdoors in, we say!  It is a high performing air filter that is hardy and quite tolerant to most common plant diseases. However, they do have one weak spot (like most of us right?) and are not a fan of overwatering as it can cause root rot.  

They prefer indirect sunlight but never direct sunlight!

Toxins removed: Trichloroethylene, benzene, xylene and toluene

 

Rubber Plant

Ficus elasctica Rubber plant

Last but certainly not least! The robust Rubber Plant! A lover of bright, indirect light so keeps it away from those Northern and Western windows! Grow in a pot indoors and water weekly in Summer or every 2 weeks in Winter. While it is not top of the list for air purifiers, it is certainly one of the most aesthetic looking ones that everyone should have regardless!

Toxins removed: xylene, benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene

 

Snake Plant/Mother-in-Law’s Tongue

Sansevieria trifasciata Snake plant Mothers in law tongue

Mother-in-Law’s Tongue or Snake Plant produces upright sword-shaped leaves that are deep green, thick, succulent and patterned with bands of cream, yellow.
They are sensitive to cold so can only be grown outdoors in warmer climates where they will grow in full or part sun and tolerate heat and neglect. The interesting foliage makes them useful as feature plants, they are often grown in low water and low maintenance gardens, in pots along borders and edges.
In cooler climates, they can be grown indoors either alone or with other indoor plants with contrasting foliage. They prefer bright indirect sunlight but will tolerate lower light levels.

Toxins removed: formaldehyde, trichloroethylene, benzene and xylene.

 

Philodendron

Philodendron

Philodendron care is easy because if you watch for the signals, the plant will tell you exactly what it needs. Even inexperienced houseplant owners will have no trouble growing philodendron plants because the plants adapt readily to conditions inside the home. This makes learning how to care for a philodendron incredibly simple. There are so many beautiful varieties to choose from!

Now while we know we’ve taught you a lot about air-purifying plants, the one thing we hope you take away from this is that you should buy yourself a new indoor plant! – Treat yo’ self! – and if anyone asks, it’s for the good of Earth, you know, purifying the air and all! 😉 

 

Call on (03) 9359 3331 to talk about plants – our favourite thing!

 

September in the garden 2021

Hello Hello dear gardening friends! September officially marks the end of Winter and the arrival of the most anticipated season for gardeners, nature, and sunshine lovers alike: SPRING!

Let’s open up the windows and let the fresh air in. Birds and baby animals are back, bees are busy buzzing around, flower buds are opening up, sharing their delightful fragrance and the new tender leaves are slowly unfolding. Plums, cherries, peaches, nectarines, apricots, almonds, ornamental pears and magnolias are putting on quite a show of flowers right now – and boy are the bees are loving it! We will be rewarded with some yummy fruit in a couple of months. You must be feeling more energized, soaking up some natural vitamin D from the sun and feeling motivated to spend more time in the garden. That is just perfect! There is so much to do out there.

Blooming Spring Flowers in Melbourne, Australia

Some of us have neglected the garden just a little bit over Winter and it has become quite a jungle (those guilty, raise your hands!) But stress not, it’s all good since gardening is about having a good time outside. You still have about two weeks before the soil temperature starts to rise and by then you should ideally have prepared your garden beds for the new plants you’ll be planting throughout September.

Ok, it’s time to roll up your sleeves. We have a lot of things to do in the garden, so here are some tips and tricks to get you going!

Bare Rooted Plants

If you haven’t bought your bare root plants yet, the next three weeks is your last window to get them for this year. Bare root plants are usually cheaper than the same size potted plants available at other times of the year. They are very practical and easy to plant because they are dormant until early Spring. They have the time to get adjusted to their planting spot and do not suffer from transplant shock that can usually stunt plant growth for a little while.

Click here to see all our bare root fruits and trees!
Click here to see all our Bare root roses!
We are selling those out pretty fast, so get your order in asap!

If you have already planted your bare root plants, remember to keep the soil moist. They are starting to grow leaves and will need lots of water to grow properly and get established for the hot summer ahead. Here is a practical guide about how to best plant them. Click here.

Flowers

Perennial flowers are just about to burst. You can easily pop them in your garden to give you some beautiful colours in the coming weeks. A perennial plant or simply perennial is a plant that lives more than two years. They survive over winter and come back again for more blooms!

Annual/Perennial flowers complete their entire life cycle in a single growing season. Once mature the plant will flower, produce seeds and then die off. The newly produced seeds will then stay dormant until the cycle begins again next season. Some are considered annuals instead of perennials because they do not survive harsh winters. If you protect them from frosts and the cold during winter, they will come back in Spring. Some examples are Nemesia, Scabiosa, Salvias, Petunias and Calibrachoas.

Edible flowers are a fun and easy way to add colour and flavour to all sorts of dishes — especially when you can pick them right from your own garden. Most edible flowers are best eaten raw – simply pick and rinse with water. Flowers will taste and look their best right after they have opened, rather than after they have been open for a few days.

Deciduous Magnolias in store right now are in full bloom for the next couple of weeks! These trees look amazing!

Climbers are a great way to add more greenery and flowers to any size garden. Since they can grow vertically, ideally on a trellis, they are perfect to hide ugly walls, separate spaces, create shade and attract more bees to your garden. Here are some great options that we have in store:

 

Trees

Planting trees is the best thing you can do for the environment, the world and your soul. Seeing a little sapling grow into a magnificent tree that will produce oxygen, flowers, fruits, shade and support a big diversity of wildlife, gives the greatest sense of accomplishment you could ever hope for!  WWF Australia aims to save and grow two billion trees by 2030. The time is now and together we can do this!

Ornamental pears are the star of the season and are growing all across Victoria. They are fast-growing deciduous trees with glossy green leaves, loved for their summer shade, spectacular Autumn colours and masses of white flowers in Spring. They come in a range of shapes and sizes to suit your landscaping requirements. 

Native trees are the best trees you can plant to support our wildlife. They are easy to grow since they are adapted to the local conditions and are great for water-wise gardens since they are mostly drought-tolerant!

Best-sellers!  Here are our most popular and in-demand trees. These are easy to grow and have a fantastic appeal in any type of garden!

Indoor Plants 

They purify the air in your home, reduce toxins and bring some lush greenery to your living spaces. There are so many reasons to get some indoor plants! Click here to read more about the Top 10 Indoor Air purifying plants! 

Palms are also a great option to add a little tropical touch to your indoors. We have some beautiful specimens in store.

Fruits

Soon we will be able to bite into our favourite sweet and juicy summer fruits. No need to be envious of the neighbour’s fruit loaded plants, as you can have your own, pick fresh fruit, and enjoy them when you feel like it.

Berries are so yummy and easy to grow. We have a nice selection of blueberry, blackberry, and strawberries. Perfect for healthy breakfasts or desserts

Fruit trees are the best investment ever! Plant them, take care of them and they will reward you with fresh fruit for many years to come! 

Citrus plants. Imagine sipping on some fresh, home pressed lemonade or a mojito with limes and mint from your very own garden this Summer! We have a great selection of dwarf and full-size trees such as limes, oranges, mandarins, and lemons.

Vegetables & Herbs

Spring and Summer veggies such as tomato, peppers, squash, eggplants, zucchini, chillies and basil can be sown in pots or trays and kept in a greenhouse until the weather is above 18 degrees Celsius during the day and ideally above 13 degrees at night. Planting them in the garden right now might shock them, causing stunted growth and not perform well for you over Summer. So a little patience will go a long way! You can also plant them out in the ground, but make sure to cover them with some old bed sheets or garden plastic to protect them from frosts and cold nights.

Check the weather forecast for warmer temperatures and later during the month choose a few days that are overcast and rather cool to plant your small plants out in the garden. Remember to water them in properly. An application of seaweed fertilizers will help them settle in better in their new spot.

With the temperatures slowly rising and days getting longer, many Winter veggies will bolt, which means that they will go to seed and lose their lush leafiness. So it is time to go through it all and use them up. You can either use them generously in your kitchen or also harvest and freeze them for a steady supply over Summer. 

Tomatoes are the superstars of the Spring and Summer veggie gardens! Sweet, juicy, easy to grow and very nutritious. Whether you like tomatoes in salads, pasta sauces, curries or in your burgers, we have a lovely selection to suit all your tomato dreams!

Leafy greens such as lettuce, spinach, rocket, endive, silverbeet, mustard greens, and celery will grow well in the garden at the moment. Consider working out some space for them and plant them every couple of weeks for a steady supply. Fresh salad bowls will be a perfect addition to barbeques over Spring & Summer.

 

• Root Veggies such as carrots, radish, turnips, parsnips, and beetroot are also great to plant right now. Young beetroot leaves make a tasty, colourful addition to your salads.

 

Culinary herbs will go really well with your Summer veggies, both as companion plants and as cooking condiments. We have a fantastic variety right now such as mint, thyme, oregano, marjoram, verbena, chamomile, etc. Many are great for green teas or are medicinal such as the pineapple sage or arthritis herb. Click here to see them all.

Herbal/Medicinal Tea Herbs are perfect for brewing your digestive home teas. You can either dry the leaves up and store them or use them fresh. These aid with digestion, sleep and have many other beneficial & medicinal virtues.

 

Pruning, Repotting & Weeding

Winter-flowering natives and non-natives can be pruned back and deadheaded to keep them nice and tidy. You can also prune back your evergreen trees to encourage new growth this Spring.

• If some of your potted plants have become overcrowded or looking sad, now is a great time to split them up and re-pot them. The sad-looking ones are usually root-bound and could use a light root trimming and then potting into a bigger pot, or a top-up with some fresh potting mix. Keep them partly shaded and protected for at least a week after this. Then you can give them a liquid or foliar fertilizer feed. Also remember to remove the dead, damaged and excessive growth to improve air circulation. Your succulents can be divided up and put into new pots. More plants!! YAY!

Scraggy plants. In their prime, they looked fantastic! But now some plants are not performing well despite being pruned, fertilized and taken care of. They are prone to disease and put your other healthy plants at risk. They could be old and have dwindling strength. Consider pulling them out and replacing them with something that will perform for you. Remember to rework the soil and let it settle for a week or two before putting a new plant there. If you are unsure if your plant can bounce back, you can always send us a photo of the plant with some details and we will give you some advice.

• Stay on top of the weeds and pull them out as soon as possible, as with the longer days they will start to set seed and drop them…all through your garden! And you do not want that to happen, as you will be fighting weeds all Spring and Summer long if they start spreading in your garden.

Soil, Fertilising, and Mulching

• If you have poor soil in your vegetable beds now is the time to prepare them for Spring. Throw in generous amounts of rich compost, new soil, manure, and blood and bone meal turning it over, making sure to mix thoroughly. Let it settle for a week or two and it will be perfect for your tomatoes, eggplants, and capsicums during Spring and Summer. Make sure to add some calcium to your soil to avoid diseases such as blossom end rot.

• It is also a good idea to test the pH of the soil and amend it as necessary. Remember that the pH will change with the new additions so test it at various intervals. The aim is to get a neutral pH of 6-7, which vegetables thrive in. Sulphur (liquid or pellets) and pine mulch make your soil acidic whereas lime and mushroom compost increases alkalinity.

• If your soil does not hold on to moisture and goes dry way too fast, you can add some Soil Wetter to improve clay and compacted soil. This makes your plants thrive better as the soil humidity does not fluctuate wildly, and it allows watering and rain to penetrate to the roots where the plants need it rather than just running off the surface.

• Restore some beneficial microbial activity in your soil with some compost tea.

• Put some rich compost or well-aged manure around your fruit trees, to give them the well-needed boost for the Summer fruiting season.

• It is best to give some liquid feed to Winter/Spring flowering annuals every two weeks with a complete liquid fertilizer. You can also add some slow-release granular fertilizer that will feed your plants over a period of 3 to 6 months.

• You can put some fresh mulch around your plants to keep weeds at bay. If you are putting mulch for the first time, make sure to choose the right ones as they change the pH of the soil when they break down. Pine creates acidity, so it is great for Azaleas or Camellias, whereas straw or sugarcane are recommended for veggie beds.

 

Pests & Disease

In Winter, the cold temperatures keep garden pests and diseases under control, but unfortunately, they are always lurking around and ready to spring back to life. Let’s take a look at the most common problems you will encounter this Spring.

Aphids will be back in the garden once the temperature rises, so you need to keep an eye out for them on new tender growth, especially on flower buds, roses and stone fruit trees. Numbers can increase rapidly if left undetected. Soon enough the ants will be back to farm the aphids and will be placing them strategically around the plants in your garden. Luckily, you can simply blast them off with the hose. You can also make some homemade aphid spray to use on affected plants. Mix 2 tsp vegetable oil, 1 tsp dishwashing liquid and some garlic cloves crushed,  mixed in 1lt of water and left to infuse overnight. This is completely safe for other beneficial insects.

Take pre-emptive action by planting some plants for the beneficial insect population like Ladybugs, Lacewings, Praying Mantises, Hoverflies and spiders. Some examples of beneficial plants are Queen Anne’s Lace, Cosmos, Lucerne and Calendulas. Marigolds are great to repel nematodes in the soil. Beneficial insects will control aphids and other pest populations in your garden.

• Ants like to farm aphids for their sweet dew. To control ants you could sprinkle some diatomaceous earth on the ground where there is a lot of ant activity but only when it is dry. You will have to reapply it after it has rained. It is a natural organic control method that will not harm other insects.

Citrus gall wasps are starting to emerge in late Spring to Summer when there is new growth. You should inspect your citrus trees and shave off of any galls you see using a peeler. This is better than pruning them off, as pruning creates new soft growth that the wasps love. If you decide to prune the galls, make sure to dispose of them properly by either bagging and sun drying the stems, burning them, or submerging them in a bucket of water. Some extra protection can be given by setting up some wasp traps.

Fungal diseases that can attack your rose plants are black spots, rust and mildew. Azaleas are vulnerable to petal blight, which thrives in high humidity brought by the rain and warmer temperatures. If you have noticed any fungal disease in the past on your plants, now is a good time to spray them with some organic copper-based fungicides.

Leaf curl is mainly a disease of peaches and nectarines, though it may also affect almonds and apricots. It’s caused by the fungus Taphrina deformans and occurs wherever peaches and nectarines are grown. Some symptoms are leaves that are entirely or partially curled, distorted and are initially pale green in colour before turning red or purple. This will result in fruit that has raised, irregular rough patches, usually red in colour. Such fruit often falls off prematurely. You can treat this with commercially available copper or lime-based fungicide sprays just during bud swelling, but before they have opened. Once opened it is too late to spray as the leaves will get damaged. A second spray in Autumn, once the leaves have dropped will greatly reduce the chance of re-emergence of leaf curl.

That’s it for this month!

Keep yourself busy in the garden, there is no better therapy to stay mentally and physically fit! And as usual, stay safe lovely people  🙂

Gardening September 2021 Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

August in the garden 2021!

Hello Hello, dear gardening friends! August is here and we start yet another exciting month in the garden. We are still getting a few frosty mornings in Melbourne, but the days are getting noticeably longer. This is the last month of cold Winter days, and soon we will be in jumping into the most exciting season: Spring! But before Spring gets here, there is a lot to do in the garden, to get it ready for this magical time of the year!

Right now native plants, Azaleas, and Camellias are reaching the end of their flowering season. Acacias and Hardenbergias are putting on dramatic displays and deciduous trees such as cherries and magnolias have swelling buds that are getting ready to burst open revealing their great unique beauty and delightful fragrance.

Despite the cold, we know how eager you are to get into the garden, but where to start? Here are some things to do in the garden:

June Garden Gardening Melbourne Australia Victoria

With our list of things to do, winter will fly by and you’ll be ready to hop into spring!

What’s in store!?

Bare Rooted Trees! 

A Farmer with Bare Root Fruit Trees

Bare-roots trees and roses are here! In winter, plants go dormant and they transplant much easier than when they’re in leaf. This includes your roses, fruit trees and deciduous ornamentals such as Poplars, Elms, Ash’s and Oaks, just to name a few. Every year, nurseries supply vast amounts of bare-rooted plants at much cheaper prices than if they were in their pots. This is because they are easier to store and transport, thus keeping costs low.

Choose trees with a good structure or framework. Check for any splits. And remember to prune your fruit and ornamental trees back before planting. This pruning is to remove any damaged branches and roots as well as prepare the overall shape for the spring.

We have a big range of bare-rooted fruit trees and ornamental trees already in-store and more coming in pretty soon, so keep an eye out for those on our website. Here are some that we have already received:

Click here to see all our bare root trees!

Bare Root Roses!

We have just received a shipment of thousands of bare root standard roses, so now is the best time of the year to get some in your garden, as they are of great quality. Whether you want 20 of the same colour or perhaps a fantastic mix of different colour roses depending on the garden colour scheme of your choice, you can get all of them in-store here in Campbellfield!
For more on how to plant your Bare Root Roses, Click here!

We have most of the roses in 2ft and 3ft standards with a few 4ft Standards!

To check out our full range of Bare Rooted Roses, Click here!

 

 

Get a Free Garden Design

$500 Garden Design Package!

  • Is your garden needing a little touch-up or a complete overhaul?
  • Are you selling, but the front yard is leaving much to be desired in the sales photo?
  • Tired of seeing the same old yard and want to spruce it up?

If you’re starting a new garden bed you a whole new garden, winter can be a great time to start planning it.  Where will you plant that new hedge or fix up the old vegetable patch, build up an entirely new garden bed or landscape the whole backyard! We understand that this can sometimes be a little daunting so if you’re unsure, speak to one of our sales staff about our Free Garden Design service with Chris. He will be able to assist you with all your future garden plans!

Click here to get yours now!

 

 

Garden Stimulus Package

Our Garden Stimulus Deals are still going strong! We have heavily discounted over 70 of our top selling products to make gardening affordable even with a small budget! These products are in-store and ready to be shipped to you in just a couple of days!

Click here to see all our Garden Stimulus Deals!

 

Winter Garden Colour

Very often we tend to think of winter as being a very dull time of the year for the garden. We have put together a little selection of plants that will flower in winter or just add a splash of colour thanks to their vibrant foliage!

Winter Flowers

Indoor Plants

Some days it is just too cold to be outdoors gardening, and also, not everyone has the luxury of outdoor space for plants. If that is the case for you, you can always get some indoor plants to brighten up your living spaces.

Here are some important tips for indoor plants during winter:

  • Indoor plants grow very slowly during winter, so no need to fertilise.
  • Prune and remove dead branches to tidy up the plant.
  • Keep your plants away from heaters and vents as these cause the plant to dry up and wilt pretty fast. So water your plants sufficiently.
  • Keep an eye on the moisture level of the soil to avoid over-watering.
  • As the trajectory of the sun has changed in the sky, you might need to move the plants to a sunnier/brighter spot.
  • Clean the windows for maximum sunlight and also the leaves of your plants of dust, to allow them to photosynthesise efficiently.

The Vegetable Garden – Herbs

Some great companion plants for all these are herbs are sage, winter thyme, parsley, mint, chives, coriander, dill, oregano, marjoram. They deter pests such as caterpillars. Basil does not tolerate the cold and should be grown in warmer months.

Edible Flowers

Flowers such as Pansies, Violas, Nasturtiums, Calendula and Borage are great for the winter patch! They add colour, diversity, repel pests and most importantly are tasty and pretty additions to salads!


To see our full selection of Fruits, veggies and herbs in store. Click Here!

Native Plants

Native plants are beautiful! They provide shelter and food for wildlife and promote biodiversity and stewardship of our natural heritage. They are unique because they are perfectly suited to the environment that they belong to. This means that they should survive on local rainfall patterns and in the local soil! Here is a selection of the most popular varieties we have in store right now!


Click here to see all of our Natives!

Garden Tasks: Preparing the garden for Spring!

Pruning, Repotting & Weeding

• If you forgot to prune your roses at the end of the last flowering season, you can still do it now, to get them ready for the new spurt of growth in Spring. Make sure to use clean secateurs. Pruning is best done mid to late Winter or early Spring – remember to hold off until the most severe frosts have passed in frost-prone areas.

Apricots are best pruned in Autumn, but you can still do it lightly once they have started flowering, which is right about now, to keep them tidy and manageable. Avoid pruning if your area has late frosts. (Pruning in Winter allows entry of bacterial gummosis in many stone fruit. More about this lower in the article). Other Deciduous fruit trees could also use a fresh trim now!

Winter-flowering natives and non-natives can be pruned back and deadheaded to keep them nice and tidy. It is also a good time to prune back your evergreen trees to encourage new growth this Spring.

• If some of your potted plants have become overcrowded or looking sad, now is a great time to split them up and re-pot them. The sad-looking ones are usually root-bound and could use a light root trimming and potted into a bigger pot perhaps, or the same one with some fresh potting mix. Keep them partly shaded and protected for at least a week, then you can give them a liquid or foliar fertilizer feed. Also remember to remove the dead, damaged, and excessive growth to improve air circulation. Your succulents can be divided up and put into new pots. More plants!! YAY!

Scraggy plants. In their prime, they looked fantastic! But now some plants are not performing well despite being pruned, fertilized, and taken care of. They are prone to disease and put your other healthy plants at risk. They could be old and have dwindling strength. Consider pulling them out and replacing them with something that will perform for you. Remember to rework the soil and let it settle for a week or two before putting a new plant there. If you are unsure if your plant can bounce back, you can always send us a photo of the plant with some details and we will give you some advice.

• Stay on top of the weeds and pull them out as soon as possible, as with the longer days they will start to set seed! And you do not want that to happen, as you will be fighting weeds all Spring and Summer long if they start dropping in your garden.

Soil, Fertilising, and Mulching

• If you have poor soil in your vegetable beds, with a couple of small Winter crops still growing, you could start harvesting and emptying the beds to prepare them for Spring vegetables. Throw in generous amounts of rich compost, manure and blood and bone meal and turn it over to mix it thoroughly. Let it settle for a week or two and it will be perfect for your tomatoes, eggplants, and capsicums during Spring and Summer. It is also a good idea to test the PH of the soil and amend it as necessary. Remember that the PH will change with the new additions so test it at various intervals. The aim is to get a neutral Ph of 6-7, which vegetables thrive in. Sulphur (liquid or pellets) and pine mulch make your soil acidic whereas lime and mushroom compost increases alkalinity.

• Over the winter the microbial activity in your soil is very low because of the cold. In the next couple of weeks, you can prepare some nice compost tea to give it a microbial boost for spring.

• Put some rich compost or well-aged manure around your fruit trees, to give them the well-needed boost for the Summer fruiting season.

• It is best to give some liquid feed to Winter/Spring flowering annuals every two weeks with a complete liquid fertilizer.

• You can put some fresh mulch around your plants to keep weeds at bay. If you are putting mulch for the first time, make sure to choose the right ones as they change the PH of the soil when they break down.

Pests & Disease

There are always pests and diseases lurking around, but we do not see them a whole lot in Winter. Thankfully the cold gets rid of a lot of pests and gives us a nearly pest-free garden until the temperature starts to rise.

Citrus gall wasps emerge in Spring, often timing emergence with the onset of a flush of new growth. You should inspect your citrus trees and shave off of any galls you see. Pruning the galls off, will only cause new tender growth in the plant, which will be more prone to attacks by the gall wasps. Some extra protection can be given with some wasp traps.

• There are a lot of fungal diseases that can attack your rose plants such as black spot, rust and mildew. If you have noticed any disease in the past, now is a good time to spray them with some organic copper based fungicides.

Leaf curl is mainly a disease of peaches and nectarines, though it may also affect almonds and apricots. It’s caused by the fungus Taphrina deformans and occurs wherever peaches and nectarines are grown. Some symptoms are leaves that are entirely or partially curled, distorted, and are initially pale green in colour before turning red or purple. This will result in fruit that has raised, irregular rough patches, usually red in colour. Such fruit often falls prematurely. You can treat this with commercially available copper or lime-based fungicide sprays just during bud swelling, but before they have opened. Once opened it is too late to spray as the leaves will get damaged.

That’s all Folks!

You probably thought that there was not much to do in the garden at this time of the year, but hopefully, this article has given you some insights and motivation to get a smashing start to Spring! See you next month and happy gardening lovely people 🙂

Gardening August 2021 Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

Big, Bushy and Cheap!

If you’re getting ready to sell this Spring, it’s best to make sure every part of the property is looking its best, and why not start with the first impression area – the garden!

Whether you’re patching up some unsightly corners in an already established garden or creating a whole new design from fresh, bushier, more established plants will always give a better, longer-lasting impression for the buyer.

We have lots of big and bushy stock, ready to go at reasonable prices for any budget.

Below is a list of the best choice plants in terms of price and size.

If you need assistance in choosing the most suited plant types for your location, pricing, sizing or are in need of an overall design, give us a call or book in for one of our one-on-one Garden Designs with Chris!

GARDEN BED FILLERS

BORDERS

GROUNDCOVERS

STANDARDS

FEATURE TREES

HEDGING AND SCREENING

COLOUR 

 

July in the Garden

July is here, which means that half of the year is over already, and we are officially heading into the peak of winter with its daily dose of cold and rain! Don’t let the drab slow you down this winter. There is much to do in winter to get prepared for the spring growth plus you can enjoy the many benefits of gardening! Boost your physical and mental wellness, give yourself a sense of accomplishment, relieve some stress, boost your immune system and if you have a veggie patch, you get free nutritious veggies!!

Currently, Lavenders, Camellias, Daisies, Pansys and Violas are blooming beautifully and so are some natives such as Grevilleas, Banksias, Hakeas, Proteas and Kangaroo Paws. We can also start harvesting some winter veggies such as broccoli and snow peas. Some winter flowering bulbs are starting to bloom, such as the eager Daffodils!

June Garden Gardening Melbourne Australia Victoria

With our list of things to do, winter will fly by and you’ll be ready to hop into spring!

What’s in store!?

Bare Rooted Trees! 

A Farmer with Bare Root Fruit Trees

Bare-roots trees and roses are here! In winter, plants go dormant and they transplant much easier than when they’re in leaf. This includes your roses, fruit trees and deciduous ornamentals such as Poplars, Elms, Ash’s and Oaks, just to name a few. Every year, nurseries supply vast amounts of bare-rooted plants at much cheaper prices than if they were in their pots. This is because they are easier to store and transport, thus keeping costs low.

Choose trees with a good structure or framework. Check for any splits. And remember to prune your fruit and ornamental trees back before planting. This pruning is to remove any damaged branches and roots as well as prepare the overall shape for the spring.

We have a big range of bare-rooted fruit trees and ornamental trees already in-store and more coming in pretty soon, so keep an eye out for those on our website. Here are some that we have already received:

Click here to see all our bare root trees!

Bare Root Roses!

We have just received a shipment of thousands of bare root standard roses, so now is the best time of the year to get some in your garden, as they are of great quality. Whether you want 20 of the same colour or perhaps a fantastic mix of different colour roses depending on the garden colour scheme of your choice, you can get all of them in-store here in Campbellfield!
For more on how to plant your Bare Root Roses, Click here!

We have most of the roses in 2ft and 3ft standards with a few 4ft Standards!

To check out our full range of Bare Rooted Roses, Click here!

 

Garden Tasks!

Preparing the garden. Everything is bare so time to prepare!

Pruning

This is a big one! Winter is when all major pruning is done because you can see the full structure of the plant and remove any problem branches. Fruit trees, deciduous trees and roses in particular benefit from a good prune. Fruit trees bear fruit more prolifically and look healthy after a good prune.

Pruning Standard Roses

1. Remove all the new, soft growths.

2. Cut back any dead, damaged or dying wood.

3. Remove all the suckers. These are buds that are growing from the understock and are found below the bud union.

4. You should cut it back so that it resembles a claw, don’t worry if you think you have been too ruthless. The plant should have 4-5 main leaders ready for next season.

Your rose will now have been cut by almost 2/3 of what it was. It may look like a lot but it is necessary and they love it! If you’re unsure, ask our staff or take a walk around the neighbourhood and find some of your local rose enthusiasts. Check out how much they will have cut their roses back by and you will be surprised! That’s one of the reasons they have such beautiful roses.

Pruning roses Melbourne australia

See how the big standard rose has been trimmed back, even though it had lots of leaves and flowers? This ensures that common rose diseases such as Blackspot, Powdery Mildew or Rust do not spread and affect the whole plant, since they are more vulnerable to those diseases during winter.

Protect your plants from Frost!

Frost on leaves

Frost forms from water vapour in the air, coming in contact with an object that is below freezing temperature. So basically, when the moisture in the air touches a cold windscreen, the moisture sticks to the windscreen and turns to ice!

When it comes to our plants, they expel energy continuously through the day and the night. Energy is warmth! During the day, their expelled energy is replaced by radiant heat from the sun, but at night time they become cooler as their warmth is not continually replaced. When the plant cools enough to get to freezing temperatures, frost can then form on its leaves.

Some plants can handle frost better than others. The moisture inside of the plant’s cells freeze and, like all frozen water, it expands, which can cause stress on the cells and therefore damage to the plant. When the ice is quickly thawed by the morning sun, it causes the most damage to the plant.

If your plants have been damaged by frost, don’t cut off the damaged foliage until the frosts have finished as this dead foliage will actually act as protection for future frosts.

How to tackle frost

  • Cover your frost-sensitive plants with sheets, newspaper or straw, making sure to remove them the following day.
  • Lightly water your plants before sunrise by a sprinkler system (or by hand if you’re really keen!) This can prevent frost from forming. You can lightly water frost affected plants, which gently thaws the ice, reducing the damage from the frost.
  • Use plastic sleeves and stakes to protect plants in open areas


Weed Control

Arctotheca calendula Capeweed in flower

Arctotheca calendula Capeweed in flower

Weeds don’t have a seasonal preference, they’ll turn up any time! But our one saving grace is they turn up less often in winter and the established ones that need to come out are easier to see. The soil is moist, which makes it easier to pull out these little suckers.

For the tougher weeds like clumps of Crowsfoot and Crabgrass, Dandelions or Oxalis you made need a tool to get the whole root out. The importance of getting the whole root out is so it doesn’t re-sprout. We don’t want to have to weed again! You can use a hoe or even a butter knife.

Drainage

Keep an eye out for drainage problems in the garden. After heavy rains, you can easily spot places in the garden that accumulate water and form little pools. These spots are ideal for plants that do not mind waterlogged soil. You can also use gypsum or clay breaking liquid to break up the clay soil and amend it with lots of compost and organic matter, which will improve the drainage.

Transplanting and moving

With the nice cool weather, it is an ideal time to move or transplant plants as the plants have time over winter to grow new roots and be ready for spring. You can repot plants that have outgrown their pots and are getting root-bound. Remove the plant and trim some of the roots at the bottom, shake off some old soil and add some fresh ones at the bottom of the pot to give your plant a fresh start. They will love it!

Fungal Disease

Leaf curl is mainly a disease of peaches and nectarines, though it may also affect almonds and apricots. It’s caused by the fungus Taphrina deformans and occurs wherever peaches and nectarines are grown. Some symptoms are leaves that are entirely or partially curled, distorted, and are initially pale green in colour before turning red or purple. This will result in fruit that has raised, irregular rough patches, usually red in colour. Such fruit often falls prematurely.

You can treat this with commercially available copper or lime-based fungicide sprays just during bud swelling, but before they have opened. Once opened it is too late to spray as the leaves will get damaged.


Get a Free Garden Design

If you’re starting a new garden bed you a whole new garden, winter can be a great time to start planning it. Once you’ve completed some of the steps below you can start to plan out where you will want to plant that new hedge or vegetable patch, build up an entirely new garden bed or landscape the whole backyard! We understand that this can sometimes be a little daunting so if you’re unsure, speak to one of our sales staff about our Free Garden Design service with Chris. He will be able to assist you with all your future garden plans!

Click here to get yours now!

 

Garden Stimulus Package

Our Garden Stimulus Deals are still going strong! We have heavily discounted over 70 of our top selling products to make gardening affordable even with a small budget! These products are in-store and ready to be shipped to you in just a couple of days!

Click here to see all our Garden Stimulus Deals!

 

Winter Garden Colour

Very often we tend to think of winter as being a very dull time of the year for the garden. We have put together a little selection of plants that will flower in winter or just add a splash of colour thanks to their vibrant foliage!

Winter Flowers

Indoor Plants

Some days it is just too cold to be outdoors gardening, and also, not everyone has the luxury of outdoor space for plants. If that is the case for you, you can always get some indoor plants to brighten up your living spaces.

Here are some important tips for indoor plants during winter:

  • Indoor plants grow very slowly during winter, so no need to fertilise.
  • Prune and remove dead branches to tidy up the plant.
  • Keep your plants away from heaters and vents as these cause the plant to dry up and wilt pretty fast. So water your plants sufficiently.
  • Keep an eye on the moisture level of the soil to avoid over-watering.
  • As the trajectory of the sun has changed in the sky, you might need to move the plants to a sunnier/brighter spot.
  • Clean the windows for maximum sunlight and also the leaves of your plants of dust, to allow them to photosynthesise efficiently.

The Vegetable Garden

Planting Veggies in Melbourne’s Winter is very rewarding!

It’s truly cold now, but it is just what some veggies love! Many people are concerned that nothing will survive in the cold weather, but that is just wrong because many winter veggies thrive and grow so well in the cold weather! It is even easier as you will rarely need to water the garden!

You can plant the whole range of brassicas such as cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts.
Leafy greens such as Asian greens like mizuna, tatsoi, pak choi, lettuce, rocket, spinach, mustards, spring onions, leek, kale and swiss chard.
Legumes such as Snow Peas and Sugar snap peas are very easy plants to grow right now, just make sure to provide some trellis for them.
Root crops such as radish, beetroot, turnips, swedes, parsnips, carrots, onions, potatoes and garlic. All of those would take 2-3 months before harvest, except for radish which is ready in just 30 days, while potatoes take between 90 and 170 days and garlic that takes about seven to eight months!

You can now remove any protective netting that you were using to safeguard the brassica and Asian green plants from the Cabbage White Moth and its hungry progeny, the caterpillars. As the weather has cooled enough, the moths or butterflies no longer pose a problem.

Asparagus Time to cut back the asparagus to the ground, which has yellowed as expected and then top-dress the plants with a combination of compost, aged cow manure and some slow-release fertiliser pellets.

Check out our available range of fruits, vegetables and herbs.

Some great companion plants for all these are herbs are sage, winter thyme, parsley, mint, chives, coriander, dill, oregano, marjoram. They deter pests such as caterpillars. Basil does not tolerate the cold and should be grown in warmer months.

Edible Flowers

Flowers such as Pansies, Violas, Nasturtiums, Calendula and Borage are great for the winter patch! They add colour, diversity, repel pests and most importantly are tasty and pretty additions to salads!


To see our full selection of Fruits, veggies and herbs in store. Click Here!

Native Plants

Native plants are beautiful! They provide shelter and food for wildlife and promote biodiversity and stewardship of our natural heritage. They are unique because they are perfectly suited to the environment that they belong to. This means that they should survive on local rainfall patterns and in the local soil! Here is a selection of the most popular varieties we have in store right now!


Click here to see all of our Natives!

 

That is all for this July in the Garden tips and tricks article, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Wishing you all the best, keep yourself warm and safe this winter!

Hello Hello Plants.

Bare root trees plants melbourne australia

Bare Root Plants 2021!

Bare Rooted Plants! 

A Farmer with Bare Root Fruit Trees

It’s that time of year again! Bare-root is BACK and we have loads of Bare Rooted Roses ready to go in-store. In winter, plants go dormant and dormant plants transplant much easier and stress-free than when they’re in leaf. This includes your roses, fruit trees and deciduous ornamentals such as Poplars, Elms, Ash’s and Oaks, just to name a few. Every year, nurseries supply vast amounts of bare-rooted plants at much cheaper prices than if they were in their pots. This is because they are easier to store and transport, thus keeping costs low.

Choose trees with a good structure or framework. Check for any splits. And remember to prune your fruit and ornamental trees back before planting. This pruning is to remove any damaged branches and roots as well as prepare the overall shape for the spring.

We have a big range of bare-rooted fruit trees and ornamental trees already in-store and more coming in pretty soon, so keep an eye out for those on our website. Here are some that we have already received:

Click here to read more about planting Bare rooted plants!

Bare Rooted Trees

Bare Rooted Fruit & Nut trees

 

Garden Gardening June Melbourne Victoria Australia Winter Garden

June in the Garden!

Winter isn’t coming, it’s here! June marks the beginning of winter. The stark trees, bitterly cold nights and cloudy days have done a pretty good job at reminding us all of that. But the best way to stay warm this winter is to stay active and get some gardening done!

Many may not realise that winter is the time avid gardeners do a lot of their preparation and planning. The garden reveals everything in winter. The deciduous trees and shrubs are now bare giving more space and light to areas that haven’t seen any since last year. The need for pruning becomes apparent and the bare skeleton of the plant makes it a lot easier to assess what needs to be done.

During winter we also clean up. We turn in the last of the autumn leaves into the compost heap and prepare our garden beds with compost, manure and mulch. Weeding, clearing decks and pavers are also best done now and then, after all that, there are even some things to plant!

Currently, Lavenders, Camellias, Daisies, Pansys and Violas are blooming beautifully and so are some natives such as Grevilleas, Banksias, Hakeas, Proteas and Kangaroo Paws. Bulbs are sprouting, getting ready for a spring display, and in the Veggie patch, there is a lot happening.

June Garden Gardening Melbourne Australia Victoria

With our list of things to do, winter will fly by and you’ll be ready to hop into spring!

 

Bare Rooted Plants! 

A Farmer with Bare Root Fruit Trees

It’s that time of year again! Bare-root is BACK and we have loads of Bare Rooted Roses ready to go in-store. In winter, plants go dormant and dormant plants transplant much easier and stress-free than when they’re in leaf. This includes your roses, fruit trees and deciduous ornamentals such as Poplars, Elms, Ash’s and Oaks, just to name a few. Every year, nurseries supply vast amounts of bare-rooted plants at much cheaper prices than if they were in their pots. This is because they are easier to store and transport, thus keeping costs low.

Choose trees with a good structure or framework. Check for any splits. And remember to prune your fruit and ornamental trees back before planting. This pruning is to remove any damaged branches and roots as well as prepare the overall shape for the spring.

We have a big range of bare-rooted fruit trees and ornamental trees already in-store and more coming in pretty soon, so keep an eye out for those on our website. Here are some that we have already received:

Plant Roses –  Bare Root Roses!

Now is the best time of the year to purchase your standard roses as we have hundreds of beautiful quality roses in stock. Whether you want 20 of the same colour or perhaps a fantastic mix of different colour roses depending on the garden colour scheme of your choice, you can get all of them in-store here in Campbellfield!

We have the classic iceberg varieties in 3ft and many colour varieties in 3ft and 4ft standards.

For more on how to plant your Bare Root Roses, Click here!

To check out our full range of Bare Rooted Roses, Click here!

 

Get a FREE GARDEN DESIGN!!


If you’re starting a new garden bed you a whole new garden, winter can be a great time to start planning it. Once you’ve completed some of the steps below you can start to plan out where you will want to plant that new hedge or vegetable patch, build up an entirely new garden bed or landscape the whole backyard! We understand that this can sometimes be a little daunting so if you’re unsure, speak to one of our sales staff about our Free Garden Design service with Chris. He will be able to assist you with all your future garden plans!

Garden Stimulus Package!!

Make the most out of our Garden Stimulus Deals! We have heavily discounted over 70 of our top selling products to make gardening affordable even with a small budget!
Click here to see all our Garden Stimulus Deals!

Garden Colour

Very often we tend to think of winter as being a very dull time of the year for the garden. We have put together a little selection of plants that will flower in winter or just add a splash of colour thanks to their vibrant foliage!

Winter Flowers

Indoor Plants

Some days it is just too cold to be outdoors gardening, and also, not everyone has the luxury of outdoor space for plants. If that is the case for you, you can always get some indoor plants to brighten up your living spaces.

Here are some important tips for indoor plants during winter:

  • Indoor plants grow very slowly during winter, so no need to fertilise.
  • Prune and remove dead branches to tidy up the plant.
  • Keep your plants away from heaters and vents as these cause the plant to dry up and wilt pretty fast. So water your plants sufficiently.
  • Keep an eye on the soil moisture level of the soil to avoid over-watering.
  • As the trajectory of the sun has changed in the sky, you might need to move the plants to a sunnier/brighter spot.
  • Clean the windows for maximum sunlight and also the leaves of your plants of dust, to allow them to photosynthesise efficiently.

The Vegetable Garden

Planting Veggies in Melbourne’s Winter is very rewarding!

It’s truly cold now, but it is just what some veggies love! Many people are concerned that nothing will survive in the cold weather, but that is just wrong because many winter veggies thrive and grow so well in the cold weather! It is even easier as you will rarely need to water the garden!

You can plant the whole range of brassicas such as cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Brussel sprouts.
Leafy greens such as Asian greens like mizuna, tatsoi, pak choi, lettuce, rocket, spinach, mustards, spring onions, leek, kale and swiss chard.
Legumes such as Snow Peas and Sugar snap peas are very easy plants to grow right now, just make sure to provide some trellis for them.
Root crops such as radish, beetroot, turnips, swedes, parsnips, carrots, onions, potatoes and garlic. All of those would take 2-3 months before harvest, except for radish which is ready in just 30 days, while potatoes take between 90 and 170 days and garlic that takes about seven to eight months!

You can now remove any protective netting that I was using to safeguard the brassica and Asian green plants from the Cabbage White Moth and its hungry progeny, the caterpillars. As the weather has cooled enough, the moths or butterflies no longer pose a problem.

Asparagus Time to cut back the asparagus fern to the ground, which has yellowed as expected and then top-dress the plants with a combination of compost, aged cow manure and some slow-release fertiliser pellets.

Check out our available range of fruits, vegetables and herbs.

Some great companion plants for all these are herbs such as sage, winter thyme, parsley, mint, chives, coriander, dill, oregano, marjoram, etc that deter pests such as caterpillars. Basil does not tolerate the cold and should be grown in warmer months.

Edible Flowers

Flowers such as Pansies, Violas, Nasturtiums, Calendula and Borage are great for the winter patch! They add colour, diversity, repel pests and most importantly are tasty and pretty additions to salads!


To see our full selection of Fruits, veggies and herbs in store. Click Here!

Native Plants

Native plants are beautiful! They provide shelter and food for wildlife and promote biodiversity and stewardship of our natural heritage. They are unique because they are perfectly suited to the environment that they belong to. This means that they should survive on local rainfall patterns and in the local soil! Here is a selection of the most popular varieties we have in store right now!


Click here to see all of our Natives!

Garden Tasks!

Frost! Winter is here!

Frost on leaves

Frost forms from water vapour in the air, coming in contact with an object that is below freezing temperature. So basically, when the moisture in the air touches a freezing cold windscreen, the moisture sticks to the windscreen and turns to ice!

When it comes to our plants, they expel energy continuously through the day and the night. Energy is warmth! During the day, their expelled energy is replaced by radiant heat from the sun, but at night time they become cooler as their warmth is not continually replaced. When the plant cools enough to get to freezing temperatures, frost can then form on its leaves.

You may notice under large trees there is little to no frost. Large trees shelter the plants and grass underneath. Their canopy radiates energy downward from the underside of their leaves, as these “breathe out”. This expulsion of energy keeps the area under the tree warmer for longer during the night. This is why planting your more frost-sensitive plants under trees and shelter can help protect them from frost.

Hello Hello Plants Melbourne Victoria Australia Frost on grass in the shade, the sun melting the other side by #arteliz

Sun melting the frost, and the shade sheltering it

Some plants can handle frost better than others. The moisture inside of the plant’s cells freeze and, like all frozen water, it expands, which can cause stress on the cells and therefore damage to the plant. When the ice is quickly thawed by the morning sun, it causes the most damage to the plant.

If your plants have been damaged by frost, don’t cut off the damaged foliage until the frosts have finished as this dead foliage will actually act as protection for future frosts.

How to tackle frost

  • Cover your frost-sensitive plants with sheets, newspaper or straw, making sure to remove them the following day.
  • Lightly water your plants before sunrise by a sprinkler system (or by hand if you’re really keen!) This can prevent frost from forming. You can lightly water frost affected plants, which gently thaws the ice, reducing the damage from the frost.
  • Use plastic sleeves and stakes to protect plants in open areas

 

Preparing the garden. Everything is bare so time to prepare!

Weed Control

Arctotheca calendula Capeweed in flower

Arctotheca calendula Capeweed in flower

Weeds don’t have a seasonal preference, they’ll turn up any ole time! But our one saving grace is they turn up less often in winter and the established ones that need to come out are easier to see. The soil is moist, which makes it easier to pull out these little suckers.

For the tougher weeds like clumps of Crowsfoot and Crabgrass, Dandelions or Oxalis you made need a tool to get the whole root out. The importance of getting the whole root out is so it doesn’t re-sprout. We don’t want to have to weed again! You can use a hoe or even a butter knife.

Compost

You don’t have to throw those weeds into the green bin. Chuck them straight into your compost. You will want to start building up your compost, if you haven’t already, with all your garden scraps from your winter cleaning. This will all break down over winter and be ready to put into the garden in spring.

Clearing and cleaning

The leaves that have fallen can all be turned into empty or new garden beds. By doing this you will also aerate the soil, which not only allows more oxygen flow but more water and nutrients to work through. Any mulch leftover can either be scraped back and put in the compost or, if there’s not too much, turn it into the soil along with the leaves to break down.

Existing plants and garden beds

For your existing plants, you will want to reapply mulch to keep the soil warm and retain moisture in the soil around the roots.
You may notice some of your hedging plants are turning a little yellow. This is often caused by a nutrient deficiency that occurs during the winter months. It’s nothing to be worried about as it can be easily fixed by applying Dolomite lime to the soil. It takes a few months to take effect so be patient!

Transplanting and moving

With the nice cool weather, it is an ideal time to move or transplant plants as the plants have time over winter to grow new roots and be ready for spring. You can repot plants that have outgrown their pots and are getting root-bound. Remove the plant and trim some of the roots at the bottom, shake off some old soil and add some fresh ones at the bottom of the pot to give your plant a fresh start. They will love it!

Pruning

This is a big one! Winter is when all major pruning is done because you are able to see the full structure of the plant and remove any problem branches. Fruit trees and roses in particular benefit from a good prune. Fruit trees fruit more prolifically and healthily after a good prune. Roses, too, flower better and look much more beautiful.

For more information on pruning, Click here!

That is all for this June in the Garden tips and tricks article, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. Wishing you all the best, keep yourself warm and safe this winter!

Hello Hello Plants.

Hello hello Plants Garden Stimulus

Garden Stimulus Package! Get Stimulated in the Garden!!

Aussies have been hit hard by the government’s current job seeker package ending, and the dream of getting the garden finished before the house goes on sale becomes less of a reality.

But we hear you!!

We have released our own stimulus package for growers and gardeners alike! Growers need to move their stock and gardeners need a break from the never-ending costs of their garden.

We have loads of new specials from in-store and growers across Melbourne and we’ve kept prices real loooow so you can still stay within your now tighter budget.

For a limited time until 20th July 2021, during this lock-down only, we are giving away a FREE weeping cherry for all purchases over $500! These are 5ft tall bare-rooted plants of either Cheals, Falling Snow or Subhirtella Alba variety.

Let us know in the notes when you check out on the website when ordering online or to one of our sales team when ordering over the phone.

Conditions: 1 per person/order until stocks last. Not available with any other discount.

And to stimulate your garden success even more we’re still doing our FREE Metro Melbourne Delivery for orders over $300.

If that doesn’t stimulate your gardening, I don’t know what can!

Our top Garden Stimulus offers!

$4.99 or less DEALS!